I think International Women’s Day is hugely important because times are changing and changing quite quickly.

There was a time when there weren’t many women working in football and people didn’t think it was acceptable, but I grew up watching and loving football, and I’m now in a privileged position of working in football. 

It’s a dream job, and there are more young women now who are dreaming of something. If there’s a female like me who they see on screen with a microphone, presenting or interviewing a footballer, I hope they will think ‘that’s achievable, why not?’

For so many years, there were hardly any females taking up sports journalism and when you look at how numbers are changing within universities, I think it’s great. As one of the older broadcasters now – I’m not quite 40 or 50 but nearing the end of my 30s – I’d like to think that young girls can look up to someone like myself and my colleagues.  

I’ve been working in the industry for 15 years and I guess we’ve all been subject to a little bit of sexism; not so much any more, though we do still get a bit of stick. I’m thick-skinned enough to bat that off, but I’d like to think that when these young girls come through, they won’t get the same stick we encountered in our early 20s. I think it can put a lot of people off. 

When you look at the production team at Sky, we have directors, producers, senior managers – plenty of females. The Soccer Saturday show, right up until last year, the whole time it had been going, was directed by a female.

When you look at a football pitch, there are so many roles now, there are women everywhere. Long may that continue.

For more information on International Women’s Day, click here.


Source link